US$9.99: Polaroid 100, 200 and 300 series automatic pack land camera Service Manual

Here are the Instructions / Guides / Manual you may need on How to Repair / Restore / DIY / CLEAN, LUBRICATE, AND ADJUST Polaroid 100, 200 and 300 series automatic pack land camera

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Polaroid 100, 200 and 300 series automatic pack land camera Service Manual

Language: English  

File TypePdf

Number of pages: 81 pages.

File Size: 2.7 mb.

 

The file(s) will be emailed to your paypay registered email address within 3 working days (Usually I will do this within a few hours). Due to the high quality scan, some of the file sizes are very big, i.e., >10MB. We will email you a link of the file so that you can download anytime.

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The process, invented by Polaroid founder Edwin Land, was to employ diffusion transfer to move the dyes from the negative to the positive via a reagent. A negative sheet was exposed inside the camera, then lined up with a positive sheet and squeezed through a set of rollers which spread a reagent between the two layers, creating a developing film sandwich. The negative developed quickly, after which some of the unexposed silver halide grains (and the latent image it contained) were solubilized by the reagent and transferred by diffusion from the negative to the positive. After a minute, the back of the camera was opened and the negative peeled away to reveal the print.

In 1963, Land introduced Polacolor pack film, which made instant color photographs possible. This process involved pulling two tabs from the camera, the second which pulled the film sandwich through the rollers to develop out of the camera. The instant colour process is much more complex, involving a negative which contains three layers of emulsion sensitive to blue, green, and red. Underneath each layer are dye developing molecules in their complementary colours of yellow, magenta, and cyan. When light strikes an emulsion layer, it blocks the complementary dye below it. For instance, when blue strikes the blue sensitive emulsion layer, it blocks the yellow dye, but allows the magenta and cyan dyes to transfer to the positive, which combine to create blue. When green and red (yellow) strikes their respective layers, it blocks the complementary dyes of magenta and cyan below them, allowing only yellow dye to transfer to the positive.

In 1972, integral film was introduced which did not require the user to time the development or peel apart the negative from the positive. This process was similar to polacolor film with added timing and receiving layers. The film itself integrates all the layers to expose, develop, and fix the photo into a plastic envelope commonly associated with a Polaroid photo. The SX-70 camera was the first to utilize this film.

Improvements in SX-70 film led to the higher speed 600 series film, then to different formats such as 500 series (captiva), and spectra.

This manual covers the following polaroid models:

100 Series (2.875 x 3.75 inch, 72 x 95 mm)

  • 100 Series folding cameras
    • Model 100 (1963–1966)
    • Model 101 (1964–1967)
    • Model 102 (1964–1967) 
    • Model 103 (1965–1967)
    • Model 104 (1965–1967)
    • Model 125 (1965–1967) 
    • Model 135 (1965–1967) 
  • 200 Series folding cameras
    • Model 210 (1967–1969)
    • Model 210 (1968–1970)
    • Model 215 (1968–1970) 
    • Model 220 (1967–1969)
    • Model 225 (1968–1970) 
    • Model 230 (1967–1969)
    • Model 240 (1967–1969)
    • Model 250 (1967–1969)
  • 300 Series folding cameras
    • Model 315 (1969–1971) 
    • Model 320 (1969–1971)
    • Model 325 (1969–1971) 
    • Model 330 (1969–1971)
    • Model 335 (1969–1971) 
    • Model 340 (1969–1971)
    • Model 350 (1969–1971)
    • Model 355 (1975) 
    • Model 360 (1969–1971)
    • Countdown M60 (1970) 
    • Countdown M80 (1970) 

US9.99: Yashica Electro 35 Service Repair Manual

Here are the Instructions / Guides / Manual you may need on How to Repair / Restore / DIY / CLEAN, LUBRICATE, AND ADJUST Yashica Electro 35 Rangefinder Camera

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Yashica Electro 35 Rangefinder Camera Service Manual

Language: English  

File TypePdf

Number of pages: 124 pages.

File Size: 7 mb.

 

The file(s) will be emailed to your paypay registered email address within 3 working days (Usually I will do this within a few hours). Due to the high quality scan, some of the file sizes are very big, i.e., >10MB. We will email you a link of the file so that you can download anytime.

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The original Electro 35 was introduced in 1966. It has a “cold” accessory shoe and the meter accepted film speeds from 12 to 400 ASA. Light levels are measured using a cadmium sulphide (CdS) photoresistor and powered by a mercury battery. The film speed adjustment is not implemented electronically; instead a simple twin-bladed diaphragm closes in front of the light sensor as the film speed is reduced. The light metering electronics works by accumulating the measured light level and only releasing the shutter when it has determined enough light has fallen on the film. This system allows the shutter speed to be completely step-less and to adapt to changing light levels. SLR’s would wait many years for a similar capability with off-the-film metering. The metering system can keep the shutter open for up to 30 seconds. Without a battery to power the meter, the shutter defaults to its top speed of 1/500 second.

The Electro 35 G was introduced in 1968 with largely cosmetic changes. The range of usable film speeds was extended a little up to 500 ASA. The lens was labelled a “Color Yashinon” to reassure the buying public that it was colour corrected at a time when the use of colour film was growing quickly. The Electro 35 GT was released in 1969 with a body painted black instead of the satin chrome finish.

The Electro 35 GS and GT were introduced in 1970 . They (and all later Electro 35’s) have all internal electrical contacts gold plated to prevent oxidation from impeding the flow of electricity around the circuits. The range of usable film speeds was doubled to range from 25 to 1000 ASA.

The Electro 35 GSN (satin chrome) and GTN (black) were introduced in 1973. The major change for these cameras was the addition of a hot shoe while keeping the PC socket.

 

“Pad of death”

Part of the internal mechanism involves a spring-loaded slider operating a set of switch points. As the film-advance lever is operated, this slider shoots up to its original position, hitting a small rubber pad at the top. Over time this rubber degenerates and prevents proper (internal) operation of the camera, in particular its metering circuits. The camera needs to be disassembled for this pad to be replaced.

Mercury battery

The Electro 35 was designed to operate using a 5.6V mercury battery but these have now been banned due to environmental concerns. However a 6V alkaline battery (PX28A or 4LR44) with an adaptor works just as well.

Light seals

Like many older cameras, the original foam light seals around the film compartment will eventually break down and cause light leaks. The seals are fairly easy to replace.

US$9.99: Basic Training in Camera Repair

Here are the Instructions / Guides / Manual you may need on How to Repair / Restore / DIY / CLEAN, LUBRICATE, AND ADJUST classic cameras

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“Basic Training in Camera Repair”

Language: English  

File TypePdf

Number of pages: 106 pages.

File Size: 47.8 mb.

 

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Please kindly email me (camera4service@gmail.com) your email address after making the payment. The file(s) will be emailed to you within 3 working days (Usually I will do this within a few hours). Due to the high quality scan, some of the file sizes are very big, i.e., >10MB. We will email you a link of the file so that you can download anytime.

Any questions, please ask.

We accept paypal only.

US$9.99: Canon 7 Camera Service and Repair Guide

Here are the Instructions / Guides / Manual you may need on How to Repair / Restore / DIY / CLEAN, LUBRICATE, AND ADJUST Canon 7 Bodies

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“Canon 7 Camera Service and Repair Guide”

 

Language: English  

File TypePdf

Number of pages: 25 pages.

File Size: 3.48 mb.

 

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The file(s) will be sent to your paypal registered email address within 3 working days (Usually I will do this within a few hours). Due to the high quality scan, some of the file sizes are very big, i.e., >10MB. We will email you a link of the file so that you can download anytime.

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The Canon 7 was a rangefinder system camera produced by Canon Inc., the last compatible with the Leica M39 lens mount. It was introduced in September 1961, with an integrated Selenium meter cell. Further versions, branded Canon 7s and Canon 7s Type II (or Canon 7sZ), modified the design slightly by introducing a cadmium sulfide cell.

The Canon 7 came as the first Canon reflex cameras were already on the market, but it was felt that there was a need for a fast-shooting rangefinder camera for reportage. In this niche, the Canon 7 came into direct competition with the Leica M3.

Some Canon 7s were sold in the USA as a Bell & Howell; the Canon/Bell & Howell partnership lasted until 1975.

US$9.99: Minolta XE / XG SLR Repair Manual Package

Here are Five (5) Instructions / Guides / Manual you may need on How to Repair / Restore / DIY / CLEAN, LUBRICATE, AND ADJUST   A series of Minolta SLRs, including

Minolta XE / XE-1 / XE-7 / XG-A / XG-1(n) / XG 2 / XG 7 / XG E

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“Minolta XE / XG SLR Repair Manual Package”

 

Language: English  

File TypePdf

Number of pages: TOTAL 457 pages.

File Size: 125 mb.

 

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The file(s) will be sent to your paypal registered email address within 3 working days (Usually I will do this within a few hours). Due to the high quality scan, some of the file sizes are very big, i.e., >10MB. We will email you a link of the file so that you can download anytime.

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The Minolta XE is an electronic 35mm SLR camera introduced in 1974, just one year after the professional Minolta SLR X-1. It is called XE-7 in North America, and XE-1 in Europe. In many ways, this is a refined version of the X-1, but at the same time, the calibre is not quite in the professional league. It has a fixed finder and a slightly reduced shutter speed range. Despite quite similar body castings, the XE feels lighter and easier to handle, but with a solid feel. Gone are all the unusual controls. Instead, a few improvements are incorporated. Of notice is the rear on/off switch, and next to it, the frame counter with an integral film advance indicator, confirming proper film transport. A multiple exposure lever is added, coaxial with the wind on lever. For multiple exposures, it must be operated each time. The traditional hot-shoe is at the top of the finder, while the finder shutter is a continuation of the previous model.

265975792_7c2b28f84a_m.jpg
The XE-1, a close relative
of the Leica R3. image by rst90274

The Minolta Camera Co. entered in 1972 an agreement with Ernst Leitz GmbH, to share patents, know-how and product development, possibly Kazuo Tashima’s crown achievement late in his life. He travelled Europe before founding in 1928 what later became the Minolta Camera Co., and the German camera industry had made a profound impression on him back then. The first camera to emerge from this joint venture was the Leica CL in 1973. Next came this camera, also assisted by the CopalCompany for the development of the vertical running metal blade shutter. The German Leica R3 version was introduced by Leitz in 1976, and produced in Portugal, after a short run at Wetzlar.

The exposure system is based on the well-proven CLC circuit, originally introduced on the SR-T 101, and refined by the X-1. The electronically controlled shutter has manually selectable speeds from 4 sec. to 1/1000 sec., and a backup mechanical 1/90 sec. and B. The shutter-speed dial locks in the A position, easily released by a tiny button reached when gripping the dial. The film speed is set on a dial surrounding the rewind knob. A small button just next to the black finder housing releases the ASA-dial. The value is set against an index dot to the right. To the left on the same dial is an exposure compensation scale of ±2 EV, which may easily be set depressing an almost invisible button on the dial edge.

4467883134_cd9b38fb32_m.jpg
An XE-1 with fas portrait Rokkor,
image by rokkor777

The viewfinder is quite bright and uncluttered with a centre split-image range finder. The layout is similar to the X-1, but the shutter speed scale to the right is brought closer to the image area and is much easier to read. The exposure-meter hand moves across the available speeds, brightly backlit by the SLR view extending beyond the image area. The lens aperture ring setting is visible just above the frame if sufficiently lit. Next to it is the actual shutter speed dial setting visible. Even more than twenty years after its introduction, this camera gives an impression of perfection, possibly only missing more automatic functions.

The camera operates on a 3V silver battery or two 1.5V SR44 batteries. A battery check lever with a red LED is on the left-hand side of the body. On the left-hand front is the lens release button, high at the left-hand side of the mirror housing. A PC sync. contact and an X/PF selector switch are also on the left-hand side. A lens diaphragm stop-down button is on right-hand side at the bottom of the mirror housing. Normal position is pushed in, for stop down it is pushed and let out. There is no mirror up facility. A traditional self-timer with trigger button is to the right of the mirror housing. On the base are the rewind release button, the tripod socket and the battery compartment.

The home market XE, and the XE-1 were available in either chrome or black finish, while the XE-7 came in black only. In 1976 the simplified XE-5 was made available, in Japan called the XEb.