US9.99: Yashica Electro 35 Service Repair Manual

Here are the Instructions / Guides / Manual you may need on How to Repair / Restore / DIY / CLEAN, LUBRICATE, AND ADJUST Yashica Electro 35 Rangefinder Camera

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Yashica Electro 35 Rangefinder Camera Service Manual

Language: English  

File TypePdf

Number of pages: 124 pages.

File Size: 7 mb.

 

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The original Electro 35 was introduced in 1966. It has a “cold” accessory shoe and the meter accepted film speeds from 12 to 400 ASA. Light levels are measured using a cadmium sulphide (CdS) photoresistor and powered by a mercury battery. The film speed adjustment is not implemented electronically; instead a simple twin-bladed diaphragm closes in front of the light sensor as the film speed is reduced. The light metering electronics works by accumulating the measured light level and only releasing the shutter when it has determined enough light has fallen on the film. This system allows the shutter speed to be completely step-less and to adapt to changing light levels. SLR’s would wait many years for a similar capability with off-the-film metering. The metering system can keep the shutter open for up to 30 seconds. Without a battery to power the meter, the shutter defaults to its top speed of 1/500 second.

The Electro 35 G was introduced in 1968 with largely cosmetic changes. The range of usable film speeds was extended a little up to 500 ASA. The lens was labelled a “Color Yashinon” to reassure the buying public that it was colour corrected at a time when the use of colour film was growing quickly. The Electro 35 GT was released in 1969 with a body painted black instead of the satin chrome finish.

The Electro 35 GS and GT were introduced in 1970 . They (and all later Electro 35’s) have all internal electrical contacts gold plated to prevent oxidation from impeding the flow of electricity around the circuits. The range of usable film speeds was doubled to range from 25 to 1000 ASA.

The Electro 35 GSN (satin chrome) and GTN (black) were introduced in 1973. The major change for these cameras was the addition of a hot shoe while keeping the PC socket.

 

“Pad of death”

Part of the internal mechanism involves a spring-loaded slider operating a set of switch points. As the film-advance lever is operated, this slider shoots up to its original position, hitting a small rubber pad at the top. Over time this rubber degenerates and prevents proper (internal) operation of the camera, in particular its metering circuits. The camera needs to be disassembled for this pad to be replaced.

Mercury battery

The Electro 35 was designed to operate using a 5.6V mercury battery but these have now been banned due to environmental concerns. However a 6V alkaline battery (PX28A or 4LR44) with an adaptor works just as well.

Light seals

Like many older cameras, the original foam light seals around the film compartment will eventually break down and cause light leaks. The seals are fairly easy to replace.

US9.99: Restoring Classic & Collectible Cameras

 

Expert advice for turning old cameras into valuable collectibles, these step-by-step instructions show how to restore a vintage camera. Learn to work on antique leather, brass, and wooden components to achieve a complete camera restoration.

 

 

 

Language: English  

 

File TypePdf

 

Number of pages: 122 pages.

 

File Size: 88 mb.

 

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US$9.99: Camera Maintenance and Repair: Fundamental Techniques, A Comprehensive, Fully Illustrated Guide

This manual walks the reader through every phase of camera repair and maintenance for both electronic and mechanical models. It features basics such as how to get started, camera repair shortcuts, important dos and don’ts, cleaning techniques, general disassembly and repair methods. Also included are specialized repair techniques for hundreds of cameras and accessories, how to build test instruments, where to find parts and supplies and much more.

Language: English  

File TypePdf

Number of pages: 170 pages.

File Size: 116 mb.

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CONTENTS

How to Use This Book
What Will You Need?
Important Rules and Precautions
Shortcuts–Do’s and Don’ts
Design Configurations and their Characteristics
Mechanical Cleaning and Lubrication
Optical Cleaning
Cosmetic Cleaning–Exterior Face Lift
General Disassembly and Repair Methods
Accessories and How to Maintain Them
Testing Camera Functions without Instructions
Simple Diagnostic Tools and Methods
Test Instruments You can Build
Where to Find Parts and Supplies
Mechanically Controlled Single-Lens Reflexes
Mechanically Controlled Rangefinder Cameras
Electronically Controlled Single-Lens Reflexes
Electronic Lens-Shutter Cameras
Medium Format Cameras
Quick Notes
Appendix:
Lubrication Recommendations Chart
Blur-Finder Charts
Out-of Focus Troubleshooter
Shutter Speed Scales
Film Speed and Aperture Scales
Exposure Recommendation Charts for Manual Settings
Converting a Commodore-64 to a Shutter-Speed Tester
Camera Distributors and Other Sources for Parts
Recommended Readings
Glossary
Index

The file(s) will be emailed to your paypay registered email address within 3 working days (Usually I will do this within a few hours). Due to the high quality scan, some of the file sizes are very big, i.e., >10MB. We will email you a link of the file so that you can download anytime.

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US$9.99: Basic Training in Camera Repair

Here are the Instructions / Guides / Manual you may need on How to Repair / Restore / DIY / CLEAN, LUBRICATE, AND ADJUST classic cameras

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“Basic Training in Camera Repair”

Language: English  

File TypePdf

Number of pages: 106 pages.

File Size: 47.8 mb.

 

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Please kindly email me (camera4service@gmail.com) your email address after making the payment. The file(s) will be emailed to you within 3 working days (Usually I will do this within a few hours). Due to the high quality scan, some of the file sizes are very big, i.e., >10MB. We will email you a link of the file so that you can download anytime.

Any questions, please ask.

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US$9.99: Contaflex I, II, III and IV Service and Repair Guide / Manual

Here are the Instructions / Guides / Manual you may need on How to Repair / Restore / DIY / CLEAN, LUBRICATE, AND ADJUST Contaflex I, II, III and IV Cameras

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“Contaflex I, II, III and IV Service and Repair Guide / Manual”

Language: English  

File TypePdf

Number of pages: 190 pages.

File Size: 18.5 mb.

 

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The file(s) will be emailed to you within 3 working days (Usually I will do this within a few hours). Due to the high quality scan, some of the file sizes are very big, i.e., >10MB. We will email you a link of the file so that you can download anytime.

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The Contaflex I, launched in 1953, was equipped with a fixed Zeiss Tessar 45mm f:2.8 lens with front-cell focusing. The very first Contaflex I had a Synchro-Compur shutter with the old scale of shutter speeds (1-2-5-10-20-50-100-200-500), but very soon it adopted the new scale 1-2-4-8-15-30-60-125-250-500.

The Contaflex II, introduced the following year, was the same camera with an uncoupled selenium meter added to one side of the front plate.

Both had a fixed lens but to the front of which could be attached a supplementary lens, called the Teleskop 1.7x.

The Contaflex III, launched in 1956, was the same as the I, but equipped with a Zeiss Tessar 50mm f:2.8 with helical focusing. The front element of the lens was removable and could be replaced by supplementary lenses, discussed in the section Contaflex lenses.

The Contaflex IV, introduced the same year, was the same camera with the uncoupled meter inherited from the Contaflex II.

 

We have already seen that the Contaflex I and II could only take the Teleskop 1.7x supplementary lenses, and that the Alpha, Beta and Prima had their own limited range of Pantar supplementary lenses.

The models III, IV, Rapid, Super, Super (new), Super B, Super BC and S all have a Zeiss Tessar 50mm f:2.8 lens (27mm screw-in or 28.5mm push-on filters) with interchangeable front element. All of them can take a small range of supplementary lenses:

  • Zeiss Pro-Tessar 35/4 (49mm filters), later replaced by the Pro-Tessar 35/3.2 (60mm screw-over filters)
  • Zeiss Pro-Tessar 85/4 (60mm screw-over filters), later replaced by the Pro-Tessar 80/3.2 (60mm filters)
  • Zeiss Pro-Tessar 115/4 (67mm filters)
  • Monocular 8x30B, equivalent to a 400mm lens (attaches to the 50mm f/2.8 Tessar lens).

There was also a Zeiss Pro-Tessar M 1:1 supplementary lens, that kept the focal length of 50mm but allowed 1:1 reproduction. The effective speed of the M 1:1 lens is f/5.6. The 50mm standard front elements, as well as the Pro-Tessar M 1:1 elements, were different between the early models III, IV, Rapid and Super with the old model of Tessar, and the later models Super (new), Super B, Super BC and S with the recomputed Tessar. It appears that the mount was very slightly modified, and it seems physically impossible to mismatch the elements as the journal diameter above the bayonet mount had been reduced by approximately .006″

There were also stereo attachments:

  • Steritar A for the Contaflex I and II
  • Steritar B for the other Tessar-equipped models
  • Near Steritar for close up stereo pictures .2 – 2.5 meters

(Normally interchangeable with the older Tessar line of Steritar B camera lenses)

  • Steritar D for the Pantar-equipped models

A complete line of these Contaflex Steritar lenses can be seen at (http://www.flickr.com/photos/12670411@N02/)