US$9.99: Camera Maintenance & Repair – Advanced Techniques

This book builds on the basics, and teaches techniques that refine your camera repair skills. Whether you tinker with cameras or own a repair shop, this book is a necessity. The ideal companion to the top selling Camera Maintenance & Repair (Book 1). Clear step-by-step techniques for repair of popular, modern cameras; over 175 detailed photos & illustrations show camera parts and the specifics of disassembly and repair; and special instructions for over 100 camera models and lenses – from Bronica to Zuiko!

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Language: English  

File TypePdf

Number of pages: 167 pages.

File Size: 113 mb.

 

Table of Contents

Introduction

7

Ch. 1 Advanced Troubleshooting and Repair Methods

10

Ch. 2 Practical Electronic Repair Methods

27

Ch. 3 Rubber Tools

31

Ch. 4 Build More Instruments

34

Ch. 5 Repairing Mechanical Components

38

Ch. 6 Water, Moisture, Rust, Sand, and Fungus Damage

47

Ch. 7 Mechanically Controlled Single-lens Reflexes

54

Ch. 8 Electronically Controlled Single-lens Reflexes

65

Ch. 9 Zoom Lenses

80

Ch. 10 Mechanical Rangefinder, Viewfinder Cameras

91

Ch. 11 Electronic Point and Shoot Cameras

107

Ch. 12 Medium Format Cameras

130

Glossary

163

Index

167

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US$9.99: Canon VIT / VIL / P rangefinder camera Service/ Repair Manual

Here are the Instructions / Guides / Manual you may need on How to Repair / Restore / DIY / CLEAN, LUBRICATE, AND ADJUST the Canon VIT / Canon VIL and Canon P rangefinder cameras

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“Canon VIT / VIL / P  rangefinder camera Service/ Repair Manual”

Language: English  

File TypePdf

Number of pages: 102 Pages

File Size: 17.7 mb.

 

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The Canon VT is a rangefinder camera released by Canon in 1956. Until then, Canon had a history of making slightly modified Leica copies. The release of the VT showed for the first time that Canon could be a leader in 35mm rangefinder design.

Canon kept the Leica screw mount on the VT, and little else. They changed the film advance from a top-mounted knob to a bottom-mounted trigger. The tripod socket was moved to mount a trigger wind grip. They added a swing-open back making the camera easier to load than previous bottom loading Canons.

The VT used a cloth shutter curtain, and shutter speeds were from 1s to 1/1000, plus T and B. Available Canon lenses ranged from 25mm to 800mm, and offered lenses as fast as f/1.2. Flash sync is available for FP, M, and X.

One of its best features was a 3-position viewfinder with rotating prisms, which could be set to 35mm, 50mm and RF. In the RF setting, accessory shoe-mounted viewfinders with automatic parallax correction would be used.

 

Cannon VIL, the range finder cameras Canon, which was released in 1958. Models in the series that incorporates design designed by industrial designer, starting with type V, may be said to form the complete machine range finder with one axis non-rotating shutter dial, automatic restoration film counter, the viewfinder magnification. I think the beauty in design and does not extend to the VI series becomes larger to incorporate the exposure meter final series of Canon Leica but 7 series.Maybe because other companies did not adopt too, pretty clear and convenient, variable magnification viewfinder less likely to be evaluated is not employed in or 7 from the problem of cost but only the frame than the switch.

 

 

 

The Canon P (P for Populaire) was a rangefinder camera produced by Canon Inc., compatible with the Leica screw mounting. It was introduced in March 1959 and was marketed as a low-cost sister to the Canon VI-L. A black version was also introduced, which today is quite rare. The Canon P is the predecessor to the Canon 7rangefinder.

 

 

US$9.99: Canon 7 Camera Service and Repair Guide

Here are the Instructions / Guides / Manual you may need on How to Repair / Restore / DIY / CLEAN, LUBRICATE, AND ADJUST Canon 7 Bodies

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“Canon 7 Camera Service and Repair Guide”

 

Language: English  

File TypePdf

Number of pages: 25 pages.

File Size: 3.48 mb.

 

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The Canon 7 was a rangefinder system camera produced by Canon Inc., the last compatible with the Leica M39 lens mount. It was introduced in September 1961, with an integrated Selenium meter cell. Further versions, branded Canon 7s and Canon 7s Type II (or Canon 7sZ), modified the design slightly by introducing a cadmium sulfide cell.

The Canon 7 came as the first Canon reflex cameras were already on the market, but it was felt that there was a need for a fast-shooting rangefinder camera for reportage. In this niche, the Canon 7 came into direct competition with the Leica M3.

Some Canon 7s were sold in the USA as a Bell & Howell; the Canon/Bell & Howell partnership lasted until 1975.

US$9.99: Canon Canonet G-III 17 Repair Manual

Here are the Instructions / Guides / Manual you may need on How to Repair / Restore / DIY / CLEAN, LUBRICATE, AND ADJUST   Olympus Xa Compact Rangefinder

 

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“Canon Canonet G-III 17 Repair Manual”

 

Language: English

File TypePdf

Number of pages 32 pages.

File Size: 2.32 mb.

 

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The Canonet QL 17 GIII is the final, high-end version of Canon‘s famous Canonet compactrangefinder series of the 60s and 70s. It provides shutter-priority auto-exposure and parallaxcompensation with its 40mm f/1.7 lens. The lens is sharpest at f/4 – f/5.6 [1]. Its Copal leaf shutteroffers shutter speeds from 1/4 to 1/500, with X flash sync at any speed.

The meter uses a CdS cell mounted on the lens, just above the front element. It offers shutter-priority autoexposure, or unmetered manual mode. It uses a match-needle system in the viewfinder, showing apertures. There’s a smallfresnel lens in front of the CdS cell. When selecting a different shutter speed, you can see a ring with a series of perforations moving in front of the metering cell. This way, a smaller aperture gives less light on the cell. A simple, mechanical solution. Since the metering unit is placed within the filter thread, it compensates automatically for filters. Very handy.

It was designed to use the PX625 mercury battery, no longer available in the US. The circuitry in the camera holds up well against slightly higher voltages, so you can use a PX625A alkaline battery as a drop-in replacement, but you will find your exposures tend to be slightly off. Only the autoexposure system requires a battery, however. The mechanical shutter functions perfectly under manual settings with no battery whatsoever. Therefore, if you own a handheld light meter, you can use this camera without a battery

  • Type: Rangefinder camera
  • Manufacturer: Canon Inc. Japan
  • Lens: Canon Lens 40mm f/1.7. 6-element 4-group construction, with four newly designed glasses. Spectra coated in amber and purple. Filter thread 48mm.
  • Shutter: Between-the-lens type. Shutter speeds from 1/4 to 1/500 sec. and B. Automatically sets aperture, self-cocking combined film/shutter wind, self-timer, X-synchronization.
  • Viewfinder: Bright-Line type, Parallax Correction Mark
  • Rangefinder: Viewfinder combined with range-finder, bright frame with automatic parallax correction, aperture scale, exposure indicator, over/under exposure indicator, and over/under warning marks.
  • EE Mechanism: Built in exposure meter with CdS cell for fully automatic exposure control. Shutter speed priority system. ASA 25-800 (DIN 15-30). With ASA 100 film, EV 3.5 (f/1.7 at 1/4 sec.) EV 17 (f/16 at 1/500 sec.)
  • Battery: Originally powered by one 1.35V M20 (#625) mercury battery. Battery checker built-in. (It’s possible to use alternatives. *see above)
  • Flash: Hot shoe Accessory shoe with direct contact exclusive for Canolite D and the flash socket for the other flash units. Electronic Flash Sync with All Shutter Speeds.
  • Weight: 620g

US$9.99: Leica iiif service manual

Here are the Instructions / Guides / Manual you may need on How to Repair / Restore / DIY / CLEAN, LUBRICATE, AND ADJUST   Leica iiif rangefinder camera.

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“Leica iiif service manual”

Language: English

File TypePdf

Number of pages123 pages.

File Size: 14.1 mb.

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The file(s) will be sent to your paypal registered email address within 3 working days (Usually I will do this within a few hours). Due to the high quality scan, some of the file sizes are very big, i.e., >10MB. We will email you a link of the file so that you can download anytime.

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The Leica IIIf was Leitz‘s first 35mm camera body for screw mount lenses with built-in flash synchronization. It succeeded the Leica IIId, which was a rare variant of the Leica IIIc. Built-in synch means that, unlike its predecessors, the IIIf didn’t need an optional rework for flash photography. But flash sychronization still needed an extra adjustment, a contact number between 0 and 20 , which was depending on the type of flash bulbs. That was necessary since different types of bulbs needed different flash firing delay times for exact synchronization. The color of the contact number scale was changed from black to red in 1952 to make a distinction between the IIIf with older and the one with newer shutter types. The red dial model has a 1/50 flash sync speed compared with only 1/30 for the black dial model. When the camera body appeared on the market in 1950 it was already prepared for an upgrade adding a self-timer – that was available from 1954.

Leitz also made the IIf, without slow speeds; this also only had a 1/500 top speed on black dial models and early red dial models. The IIf has a round piece of vulcanite in the normal location of the slow speed dial. The even rarer If has no slow speeds, viewfinder or rangefinder. Unlike the IIIf and IIf, the If has the flash sync socket on the front of the body in place of the slow speed dial.

 

Below from Pacific Rim Camera Collection:

LeicaIIIFLeica IIIf Red Dial Self Timer, with 50/3.5 Elmar

Leica IIIf Black Dial, with 50/3.5 Elmar

Leica If Red Dial, with 50/3.5 Red Scale Elmar

 


In 1950 Leitz introduced what was to become the highest production screw mount Leica, the IIIF. It was essentially a IIIC with the addition of flash synchronization. Underneath the shutter speed is a ring for flash delay setting for flash bulbs. In 1952, at serial number 611000 the shutter speed progression was changed from 1/30, 1/40, 1/60 to 1/25, 1/50, 175. Earlier cameras are referred to as “Black Dial” or simply “BD” cameras, later ones are ” Red Dial” or “RD” cameras.

Another feature was added in 1954, the self timer. It can be readily identified by the large self timer arm on the front wind side of the camera. These are referred to as IIIF RD ST cameras, or occasionally as IIIF D/A cameras.

It should be noted that any IIIF camera could be sent to the factory and upgraded with a self timer.

Other variations include Canadian examples produces in Midland, Ontario, and black finish cameras for the military.

The IIC was replaced in 1951 by the IIF, a IIIF without the slow speeds. Like the IIC, the IIF had a vulcanite patch where the slow speed dial would have been. It was available both as a Red Dial as well as Black Dial. All black dial cameras, and Red Dial cameras made before 1954 have a top speed of 1/500, while red dial cameras made in 1954 and later have a top speed of 1/1000.

To round out the series, the IC was replaced by the IF in 1952. It was a IIF without the rangefinder or viewfinder. Like the IC, it had two accessory shoes on the top. Like the other cameras in this series, it was available both in red and black dial versions. Total production was just under 17,000 cameras, ending in 1958.

 

Production figures by year:

Leica IIIf

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Year Black Dial Red Dial Self Timer Canadian
1950/51 15,000 -0- -0- -0-
1951 25,000 -0- -0- -0-
1952 30,000 35,000 -0- 1000 Black Dial
1953 -0- 18,000 -0- 1000 Red Dial
1954 -0- -0- 31,000 2000 Self Timer
1955 -0- -0- 9000 1000 Self Timer
1956 -0- -0- 14,600 367 Self Timer
1957 -0- -0- 1133 -0-
Total 70,000 53,000 55,733 5367

 

 

Leica IIf

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Year Black Dial Red Dial 1/500 Red Dial 1/1000
1951 4000 -0- -0-
1952 4400 4600 -0-
1953 -0- 5000 -0-
1954 -0- 2748 3344
1955 -0- -0- 7000
1956 -0- -0- 3999
Total 8400 12348 14343

 

Leica If

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

year Black Dial Red Dial
1952 1118 800
1953 -0- 5000
1954 -0- 2000
1955 -0- 4000
1956 -0- 3900
1957 -0- 82
1958 -0- 4
Total 1118 15786